Engineering and Computing

International Foundation Year students can choose from Engineering or Computing subject routes, and a range of degree options.

What Will I Study?

Core Modules

Academic English Skills
Academic English Skills aims to provide you with thorough training in the language and related academic skills which will enable you to best achieve your academic potential at University.  These skills include the processes of academic writing, effective and extensive reading strategies, effective participation in seminars and delivery of presentations, and listening to and recording information effectively from lectures. You will also develop the accuracy and range of written and spoken language required to use language effectively and appropriately, with clarity and confidence in an academic context.

Pure Maths for Engineering & Computing

This module establishes the key mathematical concepts and procedures that engineering and computing students will rely upon and develop in detail during their academic careers and beyond. Starting from first principles, ideas such as linear and quadratic equations, trigonometry and complex numbers are introduced in order to provide a pathway to, and grounding for, more advanced study.

Route-specific Modules for Engineering students

Applied Mathematics for Engineering

This module identifies and explores the core mathematical principles and functions that underpin engineering, using practical examples to prepare students for more detailed study in specific areas including electronic and control engineering.

Physics

Under the broad heading of waves and matter, this module looks to develop your understanding of the main ideas and methods of physics and applying that understanding to solving problems.

Route-specific Modules for Computing students

Computing

This module will introduce you to object-oriented programming to facilitate your understanding of aspects such as Object-Oriented Programming Design, concepts of instantiation, inheritance, encapsulation and polymorphism, user interaction with events and parameters, and the application of basic principles of usability and good design for program interfaces.

Principles of Programming and Databases

Living in a world of ‘Big Data’ – from each individual’s smartphone to the global commercial structures of the world wide web – we are invisibly dependent of complex networks of databases and algorithms. This module introduces and explores these structures, developing an understanding of how databases are organised and work, and how programming languages can query and explore them, that future study will build upon and expand in depth.

Successful completion of this course leads to the first year of the following degrees:

Degree programmes Award Overall grade English grade
Computer Science BSc (Hons)
40%
50%
Electrical Engineering (Control Systems)
BEng (Hons) 40% 50%
Electrical Engineering (Control Systems) MEng 40% 50%
Electrical Engineering (Electronics)
BEng (Hons) 40% 50%
Electrical Engineering (Electronics)
MEng 40% 50%
Electrical Engineering (Power and Energy)
BEng (Hons) 40% 50%
Electrical Engineering (Power and Energy)
MEng 40% 50%
Games Computing BSc (Hons)
40%
50%
Mechanical Engineering BEng (Hons)
40% 50%
Mechanical Engineering
MEng
40% 50%
Mechanical Engineering (Power and Energy) BEng (Hons)
40%
50%
Mechanical Engineering (Power and Energy)
MEng 40%
50%
Mechanical Engineering (Control Systems) MEng
40%
50%
Mechanical Engineering (Control Systems) BEng (Hons)
40%
50%

These degrees and grades are subject to change.