News

28 September  

Lincoln scores high in the National Student Survey

Lincoln Student Survey

Results of the National Student Survey 2017 were recently published and the University of Lincoln has received exciting results, scoring higher than the sector average in every category, ranking in the top 20 in the UK across a variety of topics.

The survey is completed by students in their final year of undergraduate studies, and is taken by students across the UK to identify top providers of learning resources, academic support, and learning community.

Multiple Top 20 Rankings

Lincoln ranks in the top 20 out of 121 institutions in the National Student Survey for several areas, including:

  • 14th for learning resources
  • 15th for learning community
  • 16th for academic support

These top rankings confirm the Universities continued commitment to excellence and focus on developing your skills

Lincoln is Number One

Lincoln also ranked first in the UK for overall student satisfaction in three subject areas, including:

  • Sociology
  • Social Science
  • Biochemistry

Find out more about our exciting International Foundation Year and International Year One, leading to top degree study at Lincoln. 

Deserved Recognition

This isn’t the first time that Lincoln has been lauded for fantastic services. In fact, these survey results reinforce the recent results of the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) 2017, where Lincoln has been awarded Gold for delivering consistently outstanding teaching, learning and outcomes for its students.

Professor Mary Stuart, Vice Chancellor of the University of Lincoln, said: “I am proud of our performance, especially the way that so many of our subjects have been recognised for excellence and ranked in the top 10% in the UK. These results again reflect the value that Lincoln students place on the support - both academic and pastoral - they benefit from as undergraduates at this University.




Joining us at the International Study Centre

6 September

Lincoln ISC students on the main street in Lincoln town

Starting your new life in the UK is exciting and can be overwhelming. Here are some useful tips about how to prepare and what to expect when you arrive.

The upcoming September term starts Monday 18 September. Your induction programme at the International Study Centre will begin at 10am. The International Study Centre is located on campus, in the Village Hall. Download a map to help you find your way.

What you need to do

Read our arrival guide for full information on what you need to do before traveling. These things will include:

  1. Apply for a visa
  2. Book your accommodation
  3. Book your flights. Stansted Airport and East Midlands Airport are the closest to campus
  4. Make sure you’ve sent your arrival form
  5. Make sure you have insurance.

What to pack

The International Study Centre has a relaxed atmosphere, so feel free to bring comfortable clothes. You can buy everything you need in the shops on campus or you can explore Lincoln’s shopping area.

Remember to bring:

  • Your passport and visa
  • UKVI decision letter
  • Confirmation of Acceptance for Study Letter (CAS)
  • Your offer letter.

Your first week

The first day of term makes many students nervous. This is natural and you shouldn’t worry. During your first week you will get an introduction to the International Study Centre, the University and the UK as part of your induction programme. During this programme you will find out more about your course, meet your friendly tutors and make lots of new friends.

Things to do in Lincoln

There’s lots happening around the city of Lincoln when you arrive. Meet up with friends and explore these exciting events:

  • Lincoln Knights’ Reunion at Lincoln Castle, 20-27 September: check out the 36 Lincoln Knights for free
  • Outdoor Cinema at Lincoln Castle 22-24 September: watch some all-time classics like Pretty Woman or new hits like La La Land out in the open
  • High Street Farmers’ Market at High Street 22-24 September: treat yourself to cakes, snacks, and all kinds fresh and local food in the heart of the city
  • LiGHTS at University of Lincoln 29 September: this one is for curious minds to attend and get inspired by discoveries in the natural sciences, maths, and the arts.

The International Study Centre is looking forward to welcoming you. Follow us on Facebook to find out more about student life before you arrive.


Lincoln achieves gold award in new Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF)

27 June

Students work in a University of Lincoln lab.

What is TEF?

The UK Government introduced the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) to:

  • help students make the best choices about what and where to study
  • increase respect for teaching
  • recognise and reward excellent teaching
  • better meet the needs of employers.

How are the universities assessed?

Assessment criteria includes teaching quality, learning environment and student outcomes. The TEF Panel considers national data as well as written evidence from universities and colleges. The metrics cover student satisfaction, retention and employment outcomes.

What does a TEF gold award mean?

The TEF Panel concluded that, “… the University of Lincoln delivers consistently outstanding teaching, learning and outcomes for its students. It is of the highest quality found in the UK."

The Panel said there was evidence that, "students from all backgrounds… achieve outstanding outcomes". They mentioned the “outstanding physical and digital resources… including state-of-the-art teaching spaces”.

The University also received praise for its approach to personalised learning through its personal tutor system and student progress monitoring.

Vice Chancellor, University of Lincoln, Professor Mary Stuart said, "Our TEF Gold award is further evidence of our exciting teaching, great support for students and excellent employment outcomes.”

Find out more about the International Foundation Year and International Year One, leading to the University of Lincoln – a TEF gold award-winning university.

 


Tour the Engineering Hub

18 May

Are you looking for a career that is essential to the modern world? Consider studying Electronic Engineering or Mechanical Engineering at the University of Lincoln.

At the University of Lincoln School of Engineering, students work in the purpose-built Engineering Hub. Founded in collaboration with Siemens this £37 million development provides practical training with the resources you can anticipate using in your future career.

Take a tour of the Engineering Hub

 

Plan for your exciting future, studying in this state-of-the-art facility. International Study Centre students can progress to Electronic Engineering or Mechanical Engineering at the University of Lincoln by first successfully completing the International Foundation Year in Engineering and Computing or International Year One in Engineering.

 


University of Lincoln maintains top 50 ranking

10 May

Lincoln students on the grass

The University of Lincoln has retained its top 50 spot for the second year running in the Complete University Guide 2018.

129 higher education institutions were ranked on student satisfaction, research quality, research intensity, entry standards, student-staff ratio, spending on academic services, spending on student facilities, good honours degrees achieved, graduate prospects and completion.

Lincoln achieved 6th place for student satisfaction in the Complete University Guide 2018. This latest achievement follows success in the last The Times and Sunday Times University Guide 2017 and Whatuni Student Choice Awards 2017 in which Lincoln attained top ten rankings for the same category.

The Complete University Guide also provides a breakdown for 80 academic subjects placing Lincoln 3rd nationally for Agriculture & Forestry and 9th for Hospitality, Leisure, Recreation and Tourism.

See here for the Complete University Guide 2018 tables. 


Lincoln gets top marks for international and postgraduate student satisfaction

18 April 2017

The University of Lincoln has been named in the UK’s top ten for student satisfaction by postgraduate and international students in the Whatuni Student Choice Awards 2017.

Over 27,000 students from across the UK took part in this year’s survey to rate their University experience and Lincoln has been impressively ranked third place nationally for postgraduate student satisfaction and ninth for international student satisfaction.

This latest achievement follows success in the last National Student Survey and The Times and Sunday Times University Guide 2017, in which Lincoln attained top ten rankings for student satisfaction, teaching quality, and student experience.

With over 100 nationalities represented on campus, and numerous placement opportunities available to postgraduate students, these achievements are a testament to the University’s commitment to engaging with students to shape their experience.

Elly Sample, Director of Communications, Development and Marketing, at the University of Lincoln, said: “The opinions of our students are very important to us. Indeed, students are engaged at all levels at the University of Lincoln. They sit on the key decision making committees, they help to shape courses, sit on interview panels and have the opportunity to work with leading researchers in the creation of knowledge.”


New partnership gives engineering students the edge

12 July

The University of Lincoln has announced a new collaboration with one of the world’s largest private industrial automation companies.
The partnership with B&R Automation, which is headquartered in Austria and has more than 180 offices around the globe, enables engineering students to benefit from access to state-of-the-art technology, industry specific training, and unique research and work placement opportunities. As part of the collaboration, students are building new prototypes that can be tested at the University before moving into industry environments.

Dr Andrea Paoli, Senior Lecturer in Robotics and Automation in the School of Engineering, said: “Our aim is to produce industry-ready graduates who are an asset to employers from day one, so this new partnership will help us to ensure that our teaching is informed by the very latest demands of the sector. Our students are tackling important industry issues and the projects that they are working on could have a real impact.”
Andrew Norcliffe, Regional Manager for B&R Automation, said: “The University is home to state-of-the-art R&D and teaching facilities and we are excited about collaboratively developing new research programmes and curricula, which will help shape the engineers of the future.”

James Wallis, Education Manager at B&R UK, added: “Working alongside our Applications Team, students will explore real-life challenges and learn how they can be solved using cutting-edge automation solutions. Both B&R and the University of Lincoln have fully embraced the new collaboration and are already actively developing various robotic applications in a variety of industries.”


Lincoln's new Computer Science building

28 June

The University is investing £28m to build a new home for the Schools of Computer Science, Engineering and Mathematics & Physics and its growing partnership with Siemens.

Phase 1 of the project, which has been completed, includes an extension of the Engineering Hub. Phase 2 focuses on the development of the new Isaac Newton Building, expected to open in April 2017.

The Isaac Newton Building is named after one of Lincolnshire’s greatest sons, Sir Isaac Newton, who was born at Woolsthorpe Manor near Grantham. 


Lincoln is a top 50 university in the UK

9 May

The University of Lincoln has been named in the UK’s top 50 universities in the Complete University Guide 2017.

Professor Mary Stuart, Vice Chancellor of the University of Lincoln, commented: “Our place in the rankings reflects the steady work we have been developing to ensure the best experience for our students and to create the environment for excellent research to flourish.  

“This year applications to Lincoln have been higher than ever and I look forward to welcoming another excellent student year group this September.” 

Approximately £200 million has been invested in developing Lincoln’s Brayford Pool campus over the past two decades. An additional £130 million programme was announced last year, which will provide state-of-the-art buildings for staff and students in engineering, computer science, mathematics, physics, nursing, social care and psychology.

The University of Lincoln's approach to research-engaged teaching has been recognised with a commendation from the UK’s Quality Assurance Agency for enhancement of student learning opportunities.

Graduate prospects are strong with nine out of ten of Lincoln’s most recent graduates in work or further study six months after completing their studies (Destinations of Leavers from Higher Education survey 2015). 

The Complete University Guide 2017 ranks 127 higher education institutions in the UK according to student satisfaction, research quality, research intensity, entry standards, student: staff ratio, spending on academic services, spending on student facilities, good honours degrees achieved, graduate prospects and completion.


Top five things to do in Lincoln this spring

18 April 

26 - 27 April Shakespeare400 A series of public performances, programmes, exhibitions and creative activities will take place around the UK to mark the 400th anniversary of William Shakespeare’s death – one of the most famous playwrights in British history. Two evening performances will take place at the Lincoln Performing Arts Centre.
Find out more

30 April - 2 May Grand Medieval Joust This three-day medieval tournament will see four fully armoured knights on horseback competing in the Joust of Peace each day. Some of the best jousters from around the country will be here, so make sure you pick your champion and cheer him on.
Find out more

May 6 - 14 The Lincolnshire Jazz Week Jazz artists and bands from the UK and around the world will be coming to Lincoln to celebrate jazz music as part of this nine-day festival. You will be able to get into the swing as they perform in venues around the city including the Lincoln Cathedral.
Find out more

May 15 The 2016 Lincoln Grand Prix The rolling hills of Lincolnshire and the steep hills of Lincoln’s cobbled Cathedral quarter provide an exciting route for riders in this cycling competition. Some of the top cyclists from around the UK will be competing, so make sure you pick a good place to watch them from.
Find out more

May 16 Lincoln Fashion Week
Celebrate the fashion culture in Lincoln with a week of events that ends with a glamorous fashion show at St Swithin's Church. Four pop-up fashion shows will also take place during the week across the city.
Find out more


The story of Easter, and how it's celebrated

24 March

From Easter eggs and bunnies to hot-cross buns, read about how Easter is celebrated in the UK and the world.

Easter Bunny

Easter is a celebration of spring, which is why symbols of new life and good luck, such as eggs, chicks and rabbits are often associated with it.

What does it mean?
For Christians, Easter is the most important festival in the year because it celebrates the resurrection of Jesus Christ.

Origins of Easter
Easter has its roots as a pagan festival that celebrates the beginning of spring, new life coming in after the cold winter months. Many historians believe the name 'Easter' comes from the Anglo-Saxon goddess of the dawn and spring, who was called Eostre.

When is it?
Easter is celebrated on different dates each year, between 21 March and 25 April. It takes place on the first Sunday after the first full moon in the spring. The Friday before Easter Sunday is called Good Friday. This is when Christians remember the story of Jesus Christ.

In the UK, the Friday before and Monday after Easter are a bank holiday, which means many people have a day off work to enjoy time with family and friends.

What is Lent?
In Christianity, the period of 40 days leading up to Easter is called Lent. This is a time when Christians reflect on the 40 days Jesus spent in the desert, without food. Some people give up sweets, chocolate or other things they really like for the period of Lent.

What is Palm Sunday?
Palm Sunday is when Christians remember how Jesus entered Jerusalem riding on a donkey. People placed palm and olive tree branches on the road to make it easier for the donkey to walk on rocky ground.

What is Maundy Thursday?
In Christianity, Maundy Thursday is when Jesus had his last meal with friends, called 'last supper'.

How is Easter celebrated?
In the UK many people give each other chocolate Easter eggs which are usually hollow and filled with sweets. Giving people eggs is an old tradition that dates back to a time before Christianity. People also eat hot-cross buns, which are small and bread-like. They contain raisins or currants and the top is decorated with a cross.

How other countries celebrate Easter...

  • In Finland, young children dress up as witches and knock on their neighbours' doors to drive away evil spirits. The children often get chocolate eggs from the homeowners
  • In Peru, a statue of Jesus on a donkey is carried through the streets of towns and villages before it is taken to the church
  • In Spain, there is a special 'Dance of Death' Easter festival where people dance dressed up as spooky skeletons
  • In Ethiopia, the main Easter meal is a sour dough pancake called 'injera' and is eaten with a mutton or lamb stew called 'beg wot'.

International Women's Day

8 March

Originally called the International Working Women's Day, the International Women’s Day (IWD) is celebrated on 8 March every year, by both women and men around the world. The day is a celebration of women’s economic, cultural, political and social achievements. It also aims to inspire the next generation of girls and young women.

How is the day celebrated?

In some countries the IWD is celebrated in a similar way to Mother’s Day and Valentine’s Day, where women are given a greeting card or a gift such as flowers. In many countries the day is also used to raise awareness of women’s political and human rights. IWD is an official holiday in many countries around the world, including China, Ukraine and Vietnam. 

Is there a theme for 2016?

This year’s International Woman’s Day theme aims to raise awareness of gender inequality around the globe. Data from the World Economic Forum shows that in many countries women still get paid much less than men. It also shows that overall, there are less female leaders, politicians, skilled workers and university students than there are male. You can read the full report online, which also lists the countries around the world that are working hard to make men and women's roles in society, business and politics more equal. 

What is the history of the International Women’s Day?

The first IWD was celebrated on 28 February 1909, in New York, USA. In 1911 the day was celebrated in Austria, Denmark, Germany and Switzerland where more than one million women and men attended rallies to campaign for women's rights to vote and for better pay at work. In 1914 throughout Europe, the day was also used to protest the World War I. In 1975 the United Nations began celebrating the International Women’s Day on 8 March. 

Is there an International Men’s Day?

Yes, the International Men’s Day is held on 19 November every year. The day focuses on promoting gender equality and highlighting men’s contributions and achievements around the world.


Join in with the Chinese New Year celebrations

8 February
Chinese New Year in Lincoln

The Chinese New Year is an important festival that is celebrated by Chinese communities around the world. The festival dates back thousands of years – it is a special time when families get together to wish everyone peace and prosperity for the year ahead. The Chinese calendar is made up of a twelve-year cycle, and each year is named after an animal.

This new year, which starts on 8 February, is the year of the Monkey. People celebrate this special festival with colourful ceremonies and spectacular fireworks. 

Some of traditional ways to celebrate include: 

Having a family dinner
The New Year Eve's dinner is called a reunion dinner – it is a time when different generations of the family get together to celebrate and eat lucky food. 

Decorating the streets
Streets, buildings and houses will be decorated or painted in red, the main colour of the festival. People also hang lanterns in the streets and narrow strips of red paper with lines of poetry, called Couplets. As this New Year is the year of the monkey, there will also be many decorations related to monkeys. 

Giving out red envelopes
People exchange gifts during the New Year. The most common gifts are red envelops with money inside – these are meant to bring good luck, as well as money. 

Eating lucky food
It is lucky to eat certain food during the celebrations, such as fish, which is believed to bring wealth and good luck for the coming year. Dumplings, spring rolls, rice cakes and sweet rice balls are also popular food to eat during the festival. 

Setting off firecrackers
It is traditional to set off firecrackers during the New Year celebrations. The loud noise they make symbolises the end of one year, and the start of a new. The louder the firecrackers, the luckier the year ahead is going to be. 

Dragon dance
Dragons are linked to good luck, long life and wisdom, which is why during the celebrations people perform dragon dances to scare evil spirits away. During the dance the performers hold poles and raise and lower the dragon which is usually decorated in beautiful red and gold colours. The longer the dragon, the more luck it will bring for the year ahead. 

Praying in a temple
Many people go to a temple to pray for good fortune. In Shanghai, in China, thousands of people go to pray at the Longhua Temple.

  • Do you celebrate the Chinese New Year, or plan to join in with the celebrations? We'd like to wish you good health and fortune for the year ahead!

Welcome to your first week at Lincoln

12 January

International student in Lincoln

During the first week of term we will do everything we can to help you settle in to your new student life at Lincoln.

You will have a complete introduction to the UK, the university and the ISC – this is called an induction programme. You will be able to get to find out more about your course, get know your new teachers and take part in fun social activities to help you meet other students.

Some of the things you will do during the first week:

  • Meet your new teachers at the ISC and ask them any questions you may have
  • Receive information about your course, including timetables
  • Take part in fun social activities for new ISC students
  • Obtain your Biometric Residence Permit 
  • Register with the university and receive a student ID and library card 
  • Get set up and logged on to the university internet network 
  • Open a bank account 
  • Register with local health services. 

For more information about activities taking place during your first week with us, please speak to one of your tutors or staff at the International Study Centre.


Joining us in January? We've got some travel tips for you

18 December 2015
International student in Lincoln

The new term at the ISC starts soon, on 6 January 2016. To help you plan for your trip to the UK, we've put together some useful tips and information.

4 things to do before you start packing 

1. Arrange your accommodation
Complete, sign and email your tenancy agreement to iscaccommodation@studygroup.com. You will then receive confirmation and details of your new room. Find out more on our Accommodation page.

2. Book your flights to the UK
Once you’ve got your visa it's time to book your flights. Closest airports to the International Study Centre are Stansted Airport and East Midlands Airport.

3. Make document copies and take photos
Make paper copies of your documents and take some passport-sized photos, so that you have them ready if they are needed when you arrive in the UK.

4. Download our guide for new students
Our pre-arrival guide has all the information you need about what to pack, travelling to the UK and your first week in Lincoln. Find out more on our Before you arrive page.

What to pack in your suitcase

You will be able to buy everything you need in the Lincoln city centre, which has a whole range of different shops that sell everything from food and clothing, to furniture and electronics. You could pack:

  • Books and study supplies, such as pens and notepads
  • Comfortable clothes, such as trainers, jeans, t-shirts and a coat 
  • Electronic devices, such as your laptop computer and mobile phone 
  • Travel adaptors (240v with a three-pin plug) 
  • Photos of family and friends. 

What to pack in your hand luggage

It's best to check with your airline before you travel which items you can take on the plane with you. Important documents that you need while traveling need to be packed in your hand luggage:

  • Passport 
  • UKVI decision letter 
  • Confirmation of Acceptance for Study letter (CAS) 
  • Offer letter Accommodation documents (including your tenancy agreement) 
  • Academic qualification certificates Sponsor letter (if you are being sponsored) 
  • Passport-sized photographs 
  • Essential medication and toiletries.

You'll have a fun Christmas to remember in Lincoln

11 December 2015
A snowman

UK is a multicultural country that welcomes people from around the world. You will find many different holidays, festivals and occasions celebrated throughout the year here, from Chinese New Year and the Summer Solstice, to Halloween, Diwali and Hanukkah. Many people celebrate Christmas Day on 25 December and Boxing Day on 26 December. New Year's Eve, on 31 December, is celebrated too with fun parties and fireworks taking place around the country. 

Here is our guide to some of the ways we celebrate Christmas in the UK:

1. Decorate your Christmas tree
Christmas trees can be of any size or colour, real fir trees or made of plastic. The trees are usually decorated in brightly coloured tinsel, baubles and fairy lights. Have you got a Christmas tree? If you don’t have the space for one, you could decorate your room with tinsel and fairy lights. 

2. Listen to Christmas carols and pop songs
You will hear many different Christmas songs and carols played on the radio and TV, such as 'All I want for Christmas Is You' by Mariah Carey and 'Last Christmas' by Wham. Have you heard any of these songs? Why not have a go at memorising the lyrics and singing along with your friends. 

3. Send Christmas cards
Many people in the UK send Christmas cards to their friends, family and colleagues to tell them they wish them a happy Christmas. Have you written your Christmas cards? You could write a Christmas card to your friends or family in your home country to tell them you’re thinking of them. 

4. Hang up your Christmas stocking
Many children around the UK hang up a large sock called a stocking at the end of their bed, or along the the mantlepiece if they have a fireplace. The parents or relatives then fill the stocking with small gifts. Have you got your Christmas stocking ready? You could get a stocking for a friend and fill it with some chocolates or small presents.

5. Wear a Christmas jumper
You can buy Christmas jumpers from many shops around the UK. They often show fun designs with animals, such as reindeer and bears, snowflakes, bells or Father Christmas. Have you got a Christmas jumper? If you know how to knit you could even knit your own jumper, or make one for a friend. 

6. Eat a traditional Christmas dinner
Christmas dinner usually takes place on Christmas Day, with family and friends. Turkey, chicken, goose or a meat-free nut roast are usually served for the main meal with side dishes of potatoes, parsnips or carrots. You may also get to try Brussels sprouts, which look and taste like small cabbages, or pigs in blankets which are small sausages wrapped in bacon. For dessert many people have mince pies, which are small pastry tarts filled with fruit, and Christmas pudding, which is a steamed, dome-shamed dessert filled with fruit and spices. Have you arranged to have a Christmas dinner with your friends? This is a great way to try traditional British food. 

7. Pull a Christmas cracker
Made from paper and card, Christmas crackers are full of fun surprises. When pulled, the cracker makes a popping sound to reveal small gifts, including a colourful hat people often wear while they eat their Christmas dinner. Have you pulled any Christmas crackers yet? Why not buy some for you and your friends.

8. Watch Christmas films
Watching films about friendship and family is a popular activity at Christmas. Some of the most popular films which you may see on TV during December, include 'The Snowman', 'Elf', 'Bad Santa' and 'Gremlins'. Have you watched any Christmas films yet? This is a great way to relax with your friends between studies.


Lincoln comes to life in November

6 November 2015
Three international students in Lincoln

Lincoln is a lively and friendly student city, so there is plenty to see and do this month. Here are our top three things to do:

Miracle on 34th Street
9 November
One of the best known Christmas films, Miracle on 34th Street, is coming to Lincoln Theatre Royal this November. Don’t miss this heartwarming musical. Find out more

Christmas Lights Switch On
19 November
Start the countdown to your winter holiday by going along to the fun-packed annual Christmas Lights Switch On at St Marks Shopping Centre. Shops will be open late too.

Lincoln Ice Rink
28 November - 3 January
Get your skates on and take your friends along for a fun night of ice-skating on real ice. For those new to ice-skating, penguin-shaped aids will be available to help you learn to move over ice. Find out more 


Autumn celebrations in the UK

16 October 2015
Halloween pumpkins

Autumn is a lively season of the year in the UK. As the days get shorter and the weather turns colder, the trees start to shed their leaves, turning towns and countryside beautiful shades of yellow, auburn and red. There are many things to see and do, including taking part in fun celebrations such as Halloween and the Bonfire Night.

Halloween: 31 October All Hallows’ Eve, which later became known as Halloween, is the day before the All Saints' Day in the Christian calendar. It is widely believed that many Halloween traditions have evolved from an ancient Celtic festival that celebrated the end of the harvest season. The festival has changed over hundreds of years and today it is a major celebration in the UK. It is an opportunity for people of all ages to dress up in fun costumes, called fancy dress, and carve pumpkins. The pumpkins, also called jack-o-lanterns have a candle placed inside so that they can glow - you will see a lot of these at Halloween. Other traditional activities include bonfires, costume parties and trick or treating, where children dress up in spooky costumes and go around the neighbourhood collecting tasty treats.

Bonfire Night: 5 November Bonfire Night, also known as Guy Fawkes Night, is an annual celebration that started in the early 17th century. The story begins back in 1605 when Guy Fawkes, a member of the Gunpowder Plot, was arrested for planning to blow up the House of Lords, in London and King James I along with it. To celebrate the failed attempt on King's life, people of London lit bonfires. This practice soon became an annual celebration. Today, Guy Fawkes Night is celebrated with stunning firework displays across the UK, simulating the explosive gunpowder Fawkes intended to use in his plot. You can join in with the celebrations by going along to your local bonfire or fireworks night – don't forget your sparklers!

Want to celebrate Halloween in Lincoln?

New term starts soon! Are you ready for the Lincoln experience?

9 September 2015

Three international students in Lincon

With less than two weeks to go until the new term starts, we've put together a useful list of the things you need to bring with you on the first day, and the many things you can look forward to doing throughout your first week with us. We wish you the best of luck in your studies, we'll know you'll have an amazing time at Lincoln!

Your first day Your first day is on Monday 21 September 2015. You'll need to bet at the International Study Centre (ISC) at 10:00am. The ISC office is located in Room VH2002, on the 2nd floor of the Village Hall – building 7 on the campus map.

 
Top tip: Set your morning alarm early as you'll need plenty of time to get ready!

Things to bring with you on your first day:

  • Your passport
  • Visa
  • CAS letter
  • Evidence of your SELT (Secure English Language Test)
  • Financial guarantee letter (if you are a sponsored students)

First day nerves? 
Many students feel a little nervous on the first day – don't worry, this is perfectly natural. Other students at the ISC will be feeling the same, so talking to them will help you feel more relaxed and you'll soon make new friends. Don't forget that our staff at the ISC will also be there to support you every step of the way.

Your first week During your first week you will have a complete introduction to the UK, the university and the ISC. This is called ‘induction’ or an ‘induction programme’. As part of induction you will receive information about your course, such as timetables and academic information, and you'll have the chance to meet your friendly tutors.

Throughout the week you'll also have the opportunity to get involved with a whole range of social activities, specifically designed for new ISC students.

In addition, you will also learn how to...

  • Obtain your Biometric Residence Permit
  • Register with the university and receive a student ID and library card
  • Get set up and logged on to the university internet network
  • Open a bank account
  • Register with local health services.

See our before you arrive page for more information about your first day and week.


Ready to travel to the UK? Studying here will change your world

31 August 2015
Smiling international student

We know that studying at the University of Lincoln International Study Centre will be a life-changing experience. To help you on the journey from your home country to the UK, we’ve outlined what happens once you arrive, so you know what to expect.

At the airport Your airline will give you a landing card to fill in before you arrive. Once you land you will go through border control, where your passport will be checked – you may also need to have an interview with UK Visas and Immigration (UKVI).

After collecting your luggage and making your way through customs, you will reach the arrivals hall. Welcome to the UK!

Making your way from the airport to Lincoln and your accommodation

If you've booked a taxi the driver will meet you in the arrivals hall. He or she will be holding a sign with your name and University of 'Lincoln International Study Centre' on it so you will be able to find them easily. They will drive you to your accommodation.

From Humberside Airport (closest airport to Lincoln) you can get a taxi to Lincoln. Approximate cost: £40. Journey duration: 40 minutes.

From East Midlands Airport you can get the train to Lincoln via Nottingham. Approximate cost: £23. Journey duration: 2 hours and 30 minutes.

From Heathrow Airport you can get the train from London Kings Cross to Lincoln, via Newark Northgate. Approximate cost: £75. Journey duration: 2 hours. You can also get a bus or taxi.

From Stansted Airport you can get the train to Lincoln via Newark Northgate. Approximate cost: £45. Journey duration: 3 hours. You can also get a bus or taxi. 

  • Visit our before you arrive page for more information about planning your journey to the UK.

TOP TIP: Don't forget to call your parents to let them know you’ve arrived safely!

Welcome to your new home
You will live at the Gateaway, a new development located in the centre of Lincoln. Your studio will have a small kitchen area and an en-suite bathroom. Other facilities include shared lounges with a TV, super-fast broadband with Wi-Fi and 24-hour CCTV. You can find out more about Gateway and how to collect your keys on our accommodation page.

Once you've settled in make sure you introduce yourself to your new neighbours – this is a great way to make new friends. You can also start exploring Lincoln.

TOP TIP: Your room will be ready from Saturday 12 September and your first day at the ISC is on 21 September!


An international student in Lincoln

Joining us in September? We've got some great packing tips

18 August 2015

The start of the semester, on 21 September 2015, is approaching fast. To help you plan your exciting student journey to the UK, we have put together some useful tips.

Before you start packing:

  • Arrange your accommodation: Please complete, sign and return your tenancy agreement to iscaccommodation@studygroup.com. Once everything has been processed, you will receive confirmation and details of your new room. You can find out more on our accommodation page
  • Book your flights: Once you’ve got your visa it's time to book your flights to the UK. The closest airport to the ISC is Humberside Airport. You can also fly to East Midlands Airport, Stansted Airport or Heathrow Airport, all of which have transport links to Lincoln.
  • Complete the online Pre-Arrival form: We will send you a link to an online form that you need to complete fully – it will ask your flight arrival and visa details.
  • Make document copies and take photos: Please scan or photocopy all of your original documents and take four passport-sized photos. You will need to bring paper copies with you as you may need to show them at the UK border.
TOP TIP: See our Before you arrive page for further information about what you need to pack and what to expect from your first week in the UK.

What you need to pack

You’ll be able to buy most things you need to live comfortably in Lincoln, which has a range of shops including supermarkets. The ISC has an informal dress code so you can bring your comfortable clothes, such as trainers, jeans, t-shirts and a coat for the winter months. Most of your personal items, such as toiletries and clothes can be packed in your suitcase, so you can leave the essentials for your hand luggage!

Things to pack in your hand luggage:

  • Passport
  • Visa/Home Office letter
  • Confirmation of Acceptance for Study letter (CAS)
  • Offer letter
  • Accommodation documents (including your tenancy agreement)
  • Academic qualification certificate
  • Sponsor letter (if you are being sponsored)
  • Four passport-sized photographs
  • Medication
  • Laptop (if you have one)
TOP TIP: Check with your airline which items (specifically food and liquids) you can bring on the flight with you and the maximum hand luggage size allowed. 

Get to know your new home 

You can start making friends before you arrive by getting involved with our student community on Facebook. You can also find out more about the town of Lincoln and the surrounding area at visitlincoln.com


Lincoln is lighting up Lincolnshire

22 July 2015

Over the years the University of Lincoln has invested nearly £200m in its Brayford Pool Campus which was, less than 20 years ago, derelict railway sidings. 

Find out what this dramatic transformation looks like by watching this short video.


Two students working on a project

Lincoln to invest £130 million in world-class facilities‬‬‬‬‬‬

2 July 2015

The University of Lincoln plans to investment £130 million into transforming its campus with new buildings, laboratories and cutting-edge facilities that will continue to support education and growth.

Professor Mary Stuart, Vice-Chancellor of the University of Lincoln, said that the investment will drive economic growth and help to address skills gaps in key industries. She said: "We are driving change for students and for industry and I am proud that the University is a chief component of the Midlands engine, delivering growth, investment and innovation. Put simply we are lighting up Lincolnshire. 

Jonathan Taylor, Vice President of the European Investment Bank, said that the investment in new teaching and research facilities is essential for ensuring that graduates have the high-level skills needed by cutting edge companies and public services. He said: "New investment by the University of Lincoln will strengthen research excellence, enable students to benefit from the latest equipment and laboratories, and build on the university’s distinctive student experience."

Lincoln has already invested nearly £200 million into the Brayford Pool Campus which, 20 years ago, was an area of derelict railway sidings. The development had a profound effect on the area – Lincoln is now one of the UK’s fastest growing cities with a thriving engineering sector.

Lincoln ISC Engineering student

‭CareerAhead: Your one stop guide to career ‭success‬‬‬‬‬‬

24 June 2015

The University of Lincoln is one of the career-‭focused universities chosen for CareerAhead, ‭based on its industry links with companies such as Siemens and the BBC, degrees with an emphasis on learning by doing and great graduate employment prospects.‬‬‬‬

‭CareerAhead is your one-stop guide to career ‭success in Pakistan, Bangladesh and the UAE. A ‭series of brochures, available for you to download, explain how your degree can link to a range ‭of professions within these countries. ‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬

‭You will gain an insight into industries such as ‭banking and finance, manufacturing, IT and ‭computing, oil and gas, construction, textiles and ‭garments, telecoms and tourism.‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬‬

‭Depending on the industries you are interested in, ‭you can explore specific degree courses at six UK ‭universities, including the University of Lincoln.‬‬‬


Lincoln ISC international student

Lincoln is easy to get around, with plenty to see and do

12 June 2015

"The University campus is right next to the city so I can walk everywhere. There’s no need for me to use public transport so I save a lot of time and I’m never late for class. It’s not big but there’s plenty to do and it’s very beautiful – a great mixture of old
and really new buildings."

Reeve Lo from Hong Kong ISC Programme: International Year One Business and Management


An international student in Lincoln

Great results for Lincoln in Guardian University Guide 2016

28 May 2015

The Guardian University Guide 2016 ranks the University of Lincoln in 54th place, an impressive jump of 11 places from last year, positioning Lincoln firmly in the top half of the table.

The rankings demonstrate the University's commitment to outstanding teaching and investment in state-of-the-art facilities.

Lincoln also achieved impressive results in subject-specific rankings, with five subjects ranking in the top 20:

4th – Agriculture and Forestry 5th – Journalism, publishing & public relations
9th – Engineering
19th – Media & film studies
20th – Sports science

Professor Ieuan Owen, Deputy Vice Chancellor at the University of Lincoln, said: "The Guardian University Guide measures important factors such as student satisfaction and graduate employability. The University of Lincoln’s  continued success in these areas is testament to the commitment of our talented staff, their outstanding teaching and the state-of-the-art facilities that we continue to invest in.

"We are delighted to see that Lincoln’s excellence in areas such as engineering and journalism has been recognised. Our University is leading the way in a diverse range of subjects, and that is great news for our students and for the city of Lincoln."

The Complete University Guide 2016 ranks institutions by key measures such as student satisfaction, graduate employability, good honours degrees, spending on facilities and student-staff ratios.

For more information, please visit theguardian.com/education/universityguide


Three international students in Lincoln

Lincoln named among top 40 English universities

1 May 2015

The Complete University Guide 2016, published this week, places Lincoln 40th out of 103 English universities listed. 

The University of Lincoln is in the 51st position overall, out of 126 UK higher education institutions. This is a jump of four places from last year's UK rankings, positioning the University firmly in the top half of the tables.

The University of Lincoln was named in the Top 5 Universities in the East Midlands, and described as offering "a quality education with an inspiring atmosphere".

Professor Mary Stuart, Vice Chancellor at the University of Lincoln, commented: “The Complete University Guide is the latest analysis to show that the University of Lincoln successfully combines two essential activities: excellent teaching and excellent research. 

“We are a forward thinking university with high ambitions and we are continuing to invest in exceptional academic staff at Lincoln along with expanding our state-of-the-art new facilities for students and researchers. All this contributes to a community on campus where our students and researchers can thrive and develop.”

The Complete University Guide 2016 ranks institutions by key measures such as student satisfaction, graduate employability, good honours degrees, spending on facilities and student-staff ratios.

For more information, please visit thecompleteuniversityguide.co.uk.


Three international students in Lincoln

Lincoln 3rd in England for percentage who walk to university

17 December 2014

Affordable, safe and environmentally aware, the University of Lincoln features in the top five in a new league table published by the Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA).

With more than three quarters of its students choosing to walk to class rather than take public transport, the University is ranked third in England, and fourth in the UK, for the percentage of students who commute on foot.

Lincoln also enjoys the second lowest student-relevant crime rates in the East Midlands (The Complete University Guide 2014), making it one of the safest universities in the region.

Last month, the University of Lincoln received a Green Award recognising its commitment to reducing environmental impact. The award is the highest level of accreditation from the nationwide Investors in the Environment (iiE) scheme.

To find out more about Lincoln's commitment to active, environmentally-friendly student travel, read the full article on the University of Lincoln website.


Halloween pumpkins

Autumn celebrations in the UK

21 October 2014

Autumn is a lively season of the year in the UK. As the days get shorter and the weather turns colder, the trees start to shed their leaves, turning towns and countryside beautiful shades of yellow, auburn and red. There are many things to see and do, including taking part in fun celebrations such as Halloween and the Bonfire Night. 

Halloween: 31 October All Hallows’ Eve, which later became known as Halloween, is the day before the All Saints' Day in the Christian calendar. It is widely believed that many Halloween traditions have evolved from an ancient Celtic festival that celebrated the end of the harvest season. The festival has changed over hundreds of years and today it is a major celebration in the UK. It is an opportunity for people of all ages to dress up in fun costumes, called fancy dress, and carve pumpkins. The pumpkins, also called jack-o-lanterns have a candle placed inside so that they can glow - you will see a lot of these at Halloween. Other traditional activities include bonfires, costume parties and trick or treating, where children dress up in spooky costumes and go around the neighbourhood collecting tasty treats.

Bonfire Night: 5 November Bonfire Night, also known as Guy Fawkes Night, is an annual celebration that started in the early 17th century. The story begins back in 1605 when Guy Fawkes, a member of the Gunpowder Plot, was arrested for planning to blow up the House of Lords, in London and King James I along with it. To celebrate the failed attempt on King's life, people of London lit bonfires. This practice soon became an annual celebration. Today, Guy Fawkes Night is celebrated with stunning firework displays across the UK, simulating the explosive gunpowder Fawkes intended to use in his plot. You can join in with the celebrations by going along to your local bonfire or fireworks night – don't forget your sparklers!

  • See visitlincoln.com to find out about events taking place in and around the city of Lincoln.

Two international students exploring Lincoln

Your first week at Lincoln ISC

17 September 2014

We look forward to welcoming you on your first day at the Lincoln ISC, which is on Monday 22 September (for students starting in September) or Monday 13 October (for students starting in October).

On your first day please go to the International Study Centre Office (RoomVH2002) on the 2nd floor of the Village Hall (building 7 on the campus map) and be there at 10.00am. It is very important that you arrive on time, and that you bring your passport, evidence of your SELT and visa with you.

During the first week of term you will have a complete introduction to the UK, the university and the ISC. The induction programme is designed to help you settle down within the university so that you can feel comfortable and concentrate on your studies. You will receive information about your course, including timetables and academic information, and there will be opportunities for you to ask questions. You will also meet your Head of Centre, ISC staff members and your teachers.

You will also:

  • Take part in social and sporting activities for ISC students.
  • Register with the university and receive a student ID and library card so you can use the facilities.
  • Get set up and logged on to the university internet network. 
  • Learn about the programme that you have registered for at the Lincoln ISC, including information about the degree you will go on to study at University.
  • Learn the rules and regulations of the ISC and the university.
  • Find out how to open a bank account and register with local health services (so that you can see a doctor if you need to).
  • Learn about visa applications.
  • Register with the UK police, if necessary.
  • Have the opportunity to ask questions about your accommodation or any other aspect of your course.

For more information please visit the Pre-Arrival Information page.

Lincoln ISC international student

Information for new students joining us in September

11 September 2014

We look forward to welcoming you at the University of Lincoln ISC. If you are joining us in September, the checklist* below will help you plan your journey.

Before you travel to the UK, please make sure you have:

  • Informed the Admissions Centre (AC) that you have received your visa 
  • Informed the AC of your flight arrival details 
  • Requested a taxi transfer with us, should you require this service 
  • Booked your accommodation and received confirmation of your room allocation 
  • Made a copy of your passport and other essential documents 
  • Taken four passport-sized photos to bring with you. 

Things to pack in your hand luggage:

  • Your passport 
  • Visa/Home Office letter 
  • CAS 
  • Offer letter 
  • Accommodation documents 
  • Your qualification certificates 
  • A sponsor letter (if you are being sponsored) 
  • Passport-sized photographs 
  • Essential toiletries and medications 
  • Photographs of your family and friends to decorate your room. 
Once you arrive at your accommodation, please remember to call home to inform your parents (or agent) that you have arrived safely. In case of an emergency you can call the ISC on +44 (0) 7585 900 671.
*Pre-arrival information is only valid for students joining us in September 2014.

Lincoln rates among the best for student satisfaction

Lincoln rates among the best for student satisfaction

13 August 2014

The University of Lincoln has been rated among the best universities in the UK for student satisfaction according to the National Student Survey 2014.

The survey places the University in the top third nationally, based on an average score across 22 questions. Lincoln scored on or above the national average in every survey category, including teaching, assessment and feedback, academic support, organisation, learning resources and personal development.

Professor Scott Davidson, Deputy Vice-Chancellor at the University of Lincoln, commented: “We are delighted that students rate their experience at the University of Lincoln so highly. Almost three quarters of our final year undergraduates completed the survey and it is clear that they valued the quality of teaching on their courses, particularly the enthusiasm of staff. 

These results are a great testament to the quality of teaching across the whole institution, and just as importantly, how our lecturers excel at developing their students into confident, articulate graduates.”

The annual National Student Survey asks final year undergraduate students across the UK for their feedback on their university, course and the aspects they feel could be improved upon. The feedback is used to compile reports which are compared year on year.

This year around 321,000 (71%) students responded to the survey, the highest response rate since it began 10 years ago. A record number of UK universities and colleges took part: 156 higher education institutions, 166 further education colleges and three private higher education providers.  

A building in Lincoln

Image courtesy of University of Lincoln

Lincoln Students' Union named best in UK

July 2014

The University of Lincoln’s Students’ Union has been named as the best in UK at the prestigious NUS Awards 2014.

Lincoln Students’ Union (Lincoln SU) has been awarded the title ‘HE Students’ Union of the Year’ at the annual National Union of Students (NUS) ceremony, which celebrates the work, achievements, and successes of student unions across the UK.

This year over 600 teams competed for just 14 awards, with Lincoln SU scooping the most celebrated accolade of the evening. A panel of judges, made up of 19 leaders from across Higher Education and business sectors, selected Lincoln SU as the stand-out team of the year.

Chief Executive of Lincoln SU, said: “We are absolutely delighted to be named HE Students’ Union of the Year. Together, the team has developed Lincoln SU into an organisation to be proud of, which puts students first by listening to their ideas and putting these into action.

This year Lincoln SU led an active campaign to democratise the organisation and improve student participation. As part of the campaign, the team worked to diversify student representation, engaging in the NUS Women in Leadership Campaign and holding focus groups with 130 international students from more than 60 countries to develop and incorporate an effective Internationalisation Strategy.


Find out more about Lincoln SU.